Monday, January 22, 2018

New Releases on the Horizon #40: January 21, 2018 - January 27, 2018


Hey everyone!  I just started this new thing on my blog called "New Releases on the Horizon!"  It's where I list all the new books being release throughout the year and I choose from 10 books that I have the most interest in checking out and I also will list the dates the books will be released and where you can find them if you are interested.


So, be on the lookout for some new books on the horizon!




Until You're Mine (Fighting For Her) by Cindi Madsen    
Expected Publication: January 22nd, 2018 by Entangled Publishing, LLC (Embrace)  
(Contemporary Romance)  


Match Made in Manhattan by Amanda Stauffer    

Falling Under: a Walker Security standalone novel (Walker Security #3) by Lisa Renee Jones  
Expected Publication:  January 23rd, 2018 by Julie Patra Publishing   
(Contemporary Romance) 


The Defiant (The Valiant #2) by Lesley Livingston    
Expected Publication:  January 23rd, 2018 by Razorbill   
(Fantasy / Historical Fiction) 


Markswoman (Asiana #1) by Rati Mehrotra   
Expected Publication:  January 23rd, 2018 by Harper Voyager  
(Fantasy / Science Fiction) 






Let's Talk About Love by Claire Kann   
Expected publication: January 23rd, 2018 by Swoon Reads 
(Contemporary Romance / LGBT) 


Eternal Life by Dara Horn    
Expected publication:  January 23rd, 2018 by W.W. Norton Company    
(Historical Romance) 
 

Reign of the Fallen (Reign of the Fallen #1) by Sarah Glenn Marsh    
Expected publication:  January 23rd, 2018 by Razorbill  
(Fantasy / LGBT) 


Brass  by Xhenet Aliu   

  
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris    
Expected publication:  January 27th, 2018 by Bonnier Publishing Australia  
(Historical Fiction) 

Book Blitz: Daughter of the Goddess by Rita Webb


Daughter of the Goddess 

Rita Webb

Publication date: November 20th 2013
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
The wind calls her to play.


Will she listen?

I was a nameless child abandoned on the temple doorsteps.

Soul, the gods called me. So they named me Nephecia.

My plans don’t include marriage to some silly nobleman. When I come of age, I will take vows and devote my life to serving the goddess of Light. As a priestess, a daughter of the goddess, I’ll make the world a better place.

The summer before my eighteenth birthday, an oracle arrives with word from the gods: I must leave the only home, the only family, I’ve ever known, to marry a stranger in a foreign land.

There must be some mistake.

If I follow my own plans, I’ll disobey the very goddess I want to serve. But how can I trust the gods have my best interest at heart?
______________________________________________________

Daughter of the Goddess is a Young Adult Fairy Tale retelling of the Greek myth Eros and Psyche, set in a fantasy world.

If you enjoy sweet love stories and fairy tales, then you’ll fall in love with Nephecia’s story. Grab your copy today.
99¢ for a limited time only!
Q&A with author Rita Webb

Where did you get the idea for Daughter of the Goddess?

My favorite Greek myth is the story of Eros and Psyche. I think it’s the only Greek myth I read with anywhere close to a happy ending, even if there was a great deal of turmoil getting there.

The philosopher in me always wondered what a soul really was. When someone says, “That music is full of soul,” what does that mean?

So Nephecia epitomizes what I believe soul means. I took her out of Ancient Greece and put her into a world of my own making.

How did the name “Psyche” become “Nephecia”?

I searched other languages for the word “Soul” and found nephesh in Hebrew.

How did the name “Eros” become “Gabin”?

Gabin is a variation of Gabriel (according to my baby name book), that means “Hero of God.” I remember something about it meaning “Beloved by God” too.

Why do you write stories?

I have 3 daughters, ages 15, 13, and 11, and I want them to grow up believing in their dreams. The only way I can see that happening is if I believe in my own.

What’s your secret to success?

My husband. He believes in me, and when I’m discouraged, he never lets me give up.

What one piece of advice do you have for new writers?

Read, write, study, write some more. Never give up. Okay, that’s 5 pieces of advice.





Leaving the house to go to school, I had schoolbooks spilling out of one hand, the other holding my place in a Nancy Drew novel, and bunny slippers still on my feet. My mom was a wee bit upset.

I haven't changed much. Still always have a book (or two) in my hand or creating stories in my head, and although I don't have any bunny slippers, I love writing in my jammies and snuggly slipper socks.

With my husband TJ (my own cuddly werewolf), I home-school our three girls, who keep us busy with art, science projects, books to read, dance classes, and walks about the park.



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Book Blitz: Cross Stroke by Elizabeth Hartey


Cross Stroke 

Elizabeth Hartey

Publication date: January 16th 2018
Genres: Contemporary, New Adult, Romance
Tracey…

One night left my heart shattered and my reputation ruined, and now my only hope is to transfer to another university far from home. Although I’m a champion figure skater and am used to succeeding, I can’t dump the burden of distrust and intimacy I’m carrying.

But when I literally crash into the cocky captain of the hockey team, sparks fly, and the attraction is as undeniable as it is unwanted.

No way is this arrogant hottie the one to help me move past my fears. Or is he…?
Dak…

Overwhelmed with guilt and remorse, I can’t forget the tragic accident that killed my first love. To avoid ever feeling that kind of agonizing loss again, I vow to stick with one-night stands with every puck bunny who glides my way and focus on keeping my position on the hockey team.

But after I meet a feisty figure skater and am then thrown together with her as a lab partner, I find I want to melt the icy walls we’ve built around our hearts.
If we don’t strangle each other first.


Tracey

My next trip into unrequited love land occurred with the esoteric art student. He had long flowing hair and haunting amber gold eyes which seemed to hold the secrets of life and made my limbs quiver. Things went pretty much the same with art boy as they did with rock god. Another beautiful friend who was unable to quench my robust desires. I introduced my music friend to my art friend and hearts and flowers bloomed all around—for them. I was happy for them. Really. Sort of. Okay, I was pissed. But I eventually got over it, and didn’t panic.

Having seen that look before, the first time rock god gazed at me, I’m not surprised or bothered by the way I’m imagining the jackass swallowing me with his eyes right now. I know it means nothing.
What does bother me is his panty melting body in full view, which I, on the other hand, am more than attracted to. My legs are starting to feel rubbery underneath me. Bambi might be the right name for me after all.

“Maybe you need glasses, Bambi.” The jackass smirks. “You can’t see the big things right in front of you.”

“My eyes are fine. For instance, I don’t see anything big in front of me at the moment.” I glance down at the Thor-size hammer between his legs.

What? I’m certainly not going to tell him he’s been blessed by the gods.

He finally decides to wrap his towel around his miraculous…waist. Doesn’t help though. I’m still aware of the perfect V of his oblique muscles pointing the way to wonderland.

“Never had any complaints before.” He grins. “And I was referring to the big black letters on the door of the locker room.”

“I came in to change my clothes.” I flip my hair back in a perfect ‘f… off’ maneuver.

“I can see that, Bambi.” He arches a brow while taking one more long survey up and down my body. “But this,” he points one finger from side to side, “is the boys’ locker room, and unless you want to start a riot, I suggest you get out of here before the hockey team gets off the ice.”




As a lover of the northeast US, my husband and I moved to the Poconos several years ago to open a Chiropractic Clinic. Four children and a menagerie of animals later, I have finally found time to fulfill my lifelong dream of writing novels. A dreamer at heart, romance is---of course---the genre I spend most of my time writing and reading into the wee hours of the morning. However, if it's a good book, any genre can keep me immersed in the story for hours.


When I’m not juggling work responsibilities and writing, I enjoy baking, knitting, traveling, hiking the beautiful hills and woods around my home and spending time with my family.



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Book Blitz: On the Edge by Dani Collins


On the Edge 

Dani Collins

(Blue Spruce Lodge, #1)

Published by: Tule Publishing
Publication date: January 16th 2018
Genres: Adult, Contemporary, Romance
When Glory Cormer’s father introduces her to ‘their’ new business partner, she’s appalled. Viking-like Rolf Johansson exudes the same alpha-intimidation that jocks used to torment her through high school. After nursing her mother the last several years, she’s trying to break out of her shell and secretly pursue a writing career, but Rolf insists she go through with the rotten deal her father struck with his brother to renovate an old chalet.

Rolf envisions this mountain as a world-class resort for elite athletes and other jet setters. As a downhill champion and owner of a world-renowned sports equipment empire, he knows what it takes to get what he wants. Nothing will stop him, especially not a hotheaded wallflower who turns the ice in his veins to lava.

Bonus Story! This book contains Glory’s novella Blessed Winter, a no-room-at-the-inn Christmas romance.


“I’m saying I don’t know how to deal with it. I’m not a sensitive man. I don’t want to hurt you again.” His fingers crept all the way around her upper arm, thumb stroking her skin as he gently clasped her in his warm grip.

“So don’t,” she suggested with a flash of irritation.

“Okay.” How did he make one word sound so dangerous? Like a dare. “You tell me what hurts more. Resisting or giving in?”

And now she was falling into an eclipse, staring into eyes that were golden and black at the same time, pulling her right out of herself and twisting her around so her body was in a sensual agony, tied up and yearning.

“Should we see?” he murmured, hands touching her with light sorcery, caressing her arm, caressing her throat, tilting up her chin.

She shouldn’t be this stupid, but she did hurt. All the time. With want…

His head lowered, slanted. His mouth hovered so she could feel the magnetic buzz of ions bouncing between their lips. When he nudged, made that first contact, her mouth stung, so hot and sensitized with anticipation she gasped.

He settled his lips over hers, hot and thorough. Confident. He kissed her in a way she had never been kissed before. This man held himself back with monumental discipline, she realized, because when he went for something, he went for it, and he was a force to be reckoned with. He claimed her with irresistible precision, mouth pressing hers open so the connection went from sweet suggestion to overwhelming passion in a single heartbeat.

She opened her mouth and let him in. Kissed him back with more offering than skill, not even hesitating. Compelled. If he was screwing with her—

Whatever she had consciously been thinking sizzled into nothing. She forgot how to form thoughts. All she knew was the feel of his lips against hers, smooth and firm, pulling just enough to make her follow him, then pressing to keep her sealed inside their world.

His hand slid through her hair to cup the back of her skull. His other arm went around her, broad hand slipping beneath her loose shirt to sit against the skin of her lower back, leaving a starfish of heat imprinted there. A shudder went through her, all of her muscles checking out and giving her body over to his strength. All she could do was lift her arms and cling around his neck, plastering herself to him while they devoured each other. Tongues came into play. His. Hers. She moaned, loving the swirling textures. Reveling in their blatant consumption of each other.

He was hard. She felt him against her abdomen and pulses of reaction hit her loins, making her want to grind against him. She wanted to do it already. Now.

As she realized how caught up she was, she yanked back, gasping.

He let her put some space between them, but kept his arm around her. His cheekbones were flushed above his beard, his eyes like liquid gold.

She hadn’t minded that beard, she realized, and wanted to stroke it with her fingers. She touched instead where the soft hairs had scraped against her chin, wondering how that rough-soft abrasion would feel against her stomach. Her thighs.

Her body reacted with a rush of heat and another pulse. She was very aware of the bed right there, while his eyes were halos of light around pupils the size of the moon.

“And that,” he said, accent thick. “Is why it is my business who spends time in this room.”





Award-winning, USA Today Bestselling author Dani Collins thrives on giving readers emotional, compelling, heart-soaring romance with laughter and heat thrown in, just like real life. Mostly she writes contemporary romance for Harlequin Presents and Tule’s Montana Born, but her backlist of forty books also includes self-published erotic romance, romantic comedy, and even an epic medieval fantasy. When she’s not writing—just kidding, she’s always writing. She lives in Christina Lake, BC, Canada with her husband of thirty years who occasionally coaxes her out of her attic office to visit their grown children.



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Sunday, January 21, 2018

2018 Caldecott Medal Challenge



Hey everyone!  I once again created a new challenge from my blog called the "Caldecott Medal Challenge!"  Sorry this challenge is last notice, but after I was reading La La In the Library's intriguing Newbery Challenge post, I felt inspired to do something similar, except it deals with Caldecott Medal winners! Do you love reading children's books?  Then this challenge is definitely for you! 


RULES:

  1. This challenge will run from January 21, 2018 - December 31, 2018.  This will be a yearly challenge, so you have plenty of time to read up on all the Caldecott Medal award winning books on this list.  Normally, this challenge would have started on January 1st, but because this challenge is recently new, it will start on January 21 for this year and next year, it will start on January 1st.
  2. This challenge is open-ended, which means that you don't necessarily have to read all the books on this list in one year.  You can read as many Caldecott Medal award winning books as you want and you will have plenty of time to complete this list or you can reread some books from this list, if you like.
  3. The sign up for this challenge will end on December 31, 2018, so you have until the end of the year to sign up for this challenge.
  4. The bonus reads is optional, which means that you don't have to read the Caldecott Honor books if you don't want to.  However, if you are interested in reading the Caldecott Honor books for some extra reading, you are free to do so.


To get you started on this challenge, here's a complete list of Caldecott Medal winners that you can check out:

  • 2017: Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe (Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.)
  • 2016: Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear, illustrated by Sophie Blackall, written by Lindsay Mattick (Little, Brown/Hachette)
  • 2015: The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat (Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.)
  • 2014: Locomotive by Brian Floca (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
  • 2013: This Is Not My Hat by Jon Klassen (Candlewick Press)
  • 2012: A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka (Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Random House, Inc.)
  • 2011: A Sick Day for Amos McGee, illustrated by Erin E. Stead, written by Philip C. Stead (Neal Porter Books/Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group)
  • 2010: The Lion & the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney (Little, Brown and Company)
  • 2009:  The House in the Night, illustrated by Beth Krommes, written by Susan Marie Swanson (Houghton Mifflin Company)
  • 2008The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick (Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic)
  • 2007: Flotsam by David Wiesner  (Clarion)
  • 2006: The Hello, Goodbye Window, illustrated by Chris Raschka, written by Norton Juster (Michael di Capua/Hyperion)
  • 2005: Kitten's First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow Books/HarperCollinsPublishers)
  • 2004: The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein (Roaring Brook Press/Millbrook Press)
  • 2003: My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann (Roaring Brook Press/Millbrook Press)
  • 2002: The Three Pigs by David Wiesner (Clarion/Houghton Mifflin)
  • 2001: So You Want to Be President?, illustrated by David Small, written by Judith St. George (Philomel Books)
  • 2000: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat by Simms Taback (Viking)
  • 1999: Snowflake Bentley, illustrated by Mary Azarian, written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin (Houghton)
  • 1998: Rapunzel by Paul O. Zelinsky (Dutton)
  • 1997: Golem by David Wisniewski (Clarion)
  • 1996: Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathmann (Putnam)
  • 1995Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz; text: Eve Bunting (Harcourt)
  • 1994Grandfather's Journey, illustrated by Allen Say; text: edited by Walter Lorraine (Houghton)
  • 1993: Mirette on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully (Putnam)
  • 1992: Tuesday by David Wiesner (Clarion Books)
  • 1991: Black and White by David Macaulay (Houghton)
  • 1990: Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China by Ed Young (Philomel)
  • 1989: Song and Dance Man, illustrated by Stephen Gammell; text: Karen Ackerman (Knopf)
  • 1988: Owl Moon, illustrated by John Schoenherr; text: Jane Yolen (Philomel)
  • 1987: Hey, Al, illustrated by Richard Egielski; text: Arthur Yorinks (Farrar)
  • 1986: The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg (Houghton)
  • 1985: Saint George and the Dragon, illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman; text: retold by Margaret Hodges (Little, Brown)
  • 1984: The Glorious Flight: Across the Channel with Louis Bleriot by Alice & Martin Provensen (Viking)
  • 1983: Shadow, translated and illustrated by Marcia Brown; original text in French: Blaise Cendrars (Scribner)
  • 1982: Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg (Houghton)
  • 1981: Fables by Arnold Lobel (Harper)
  • 1980: Ox-Cart Man, illustrated by Barbara Cooney; text: Donald Hall (Viking)
  • 1979: The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses by Paul Goble (Bradbury)
  • 1978: Noah's Ark by Peter Spier (Doubleday)
  • 1977: Ashanti to Zulu: African Traditions, illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon; text: Margaret Musgrove (Dial)
  • 1976: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears, illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon; text: retold by Verna Aardema (Dial)
  • 1975: Arrow to the Sun by Gerald McDermott (Viking)
  • 1974: Duffy and the Devil, illustrated by Margot Zemach; retold by Harve Zemach (Farrar)
  • 1973: The Funny Little Woman, illustrated by Blair Lent; text: retold by Arlene Mosel (Dutton)
  • 1972: One Fine Day, retold and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian (Macmillan)
  • 1971: A Story A Story, retold and illustrated by Gail E. Haley (Atheneum)
  • 1970: Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig (Windmill Books)
  • 1969: The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship, illustrated by Uri Shulevitz; text: retold by Arthur Ransome (Farrar)
  • 1968: Drummer Hoff, illustrated by Ed Emberley; text: adapted by Barbara Emberley (Prentice-Hall)
  • 1967: Sam, Bangs & Moonshine by Evaline Ness (Holt)
  • 1966: Always Room for One More, illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian; text: Sorche Nic Leodhas, pseud. [Leclair Alger] (Holt)
  • 1965: May I Bring a Friend?, illustrated by Beni Montresor; text: Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (Atheneum)
  • 1964: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak (Harper)
  • 1963: The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (Viking)
  • 1962: Once a Mouse, retold and illustrated by Marcia Brown (Scribner)
  • 1961: Baboushka and the Three Kings, illustrated by Nicolas Sidjakov; text: Ruth Robbins (Parnassus)
  • 1960: Nine Days to Christmas, illustrated by Marie Hall Ets; text: Marie Hall Ets and Aurora Labastida (Viking)
  • 1959: Chanticleer and the Fox, illustrated by Barbara Cooney; text: adapted from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales by Barbara Cooney (Crowell)
  • 1958: Time of Wonder by Robert McCloskey (Viking)
  • 1957: A Tree Is Nice, illustrated by Marc Simont; text: Janice Udry (Harper)
  • 1956: Frog Went A-Courtin', illustrated by Feodor Rojankovsky; text: retold by John Langstaff) (Harcourt)
  • 1955: Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper, illustrated by Marcia Brown; text: translated from Charles Perrault by Marcia Brown (Scribner)
  • 1954: Madeline's Rescue by Ludwig Bemelmans (Viking)
  • 1953: The Biggest Bear by Lynd Ward (Houghton)
  • 1952: Finders Keepers, illustrated by Nicolas, pseud. (Nicholas Mordvinoff); text: Will, pseud. [William Lipkind] (Harcourt)
  • 1951: The Egg Tree by Katherine Milhous (Scribner)
  • 1950: Song of the Swallows by Leo Politi (Scribner)
  • 1949: The Big Snow by Berta & Elmer Hader (Macmillan)
  • 1948: White Snow, Bright Snow, illustrated by Roger Duvoisin; text: Alvin Tresselt (Lothrop)
  • 1947: The Little Island, illustrated by Leonard Weisgard; text: Golden MacDonald, pseud. [Margaret Wise Brown] (Doubleday)
  • 1946: The Rooster Crows by Maud & Miska Petersham (Macmillan)
  • 1945: Prayer for a Child, illustrated by Elizabeth Orton Jones; text: Rachel Field (Macmillan)
  • 1944: Many Moons, illustrated by Louis Slobodkin; text: James Thurber (Harcourt)
  • 1943: The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton (Houghton)
  • 1942: Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey (Viking)
  • 1941: They Were Strong and Good , by Robert Lawson (Viking)
  • 1940: Abraham Lincoln by Ingri & Edgar Parin d'Aulaire (Doubleday)
  • 1939: Mei Li by Thomas Handforth (Doubleday)
  • 1938: Animals of the Bible, A Picture Book, illustrated by Dorothy P. Lathrop; text: selected by Helen Dean Fish (Lippincott)

Also, there's a bit of a bonus here if you want to read more books from the Caldecott Award winning series.  You can also read some of the Caldecott Honors. Here are some examples of Caldecott Honors you could read if you want to read some extra books for the challenge:

  • Leave Me Alone! illustrated and written by Vera Brosgol (Roaring Brook Press/Holtzbrinck)
  • Freedom in Congo Square, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Carole Boston Weatherford (Little Bee Books/Bonnier)
  • Du Iz Tak? illustrated and written by Carson Ellis (Candlewick Press)
  • They All Saw a Cat, illustrated and written by Brendan Wenzel (Chronicle Books)
  • Nana in the City written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo, (Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
  • The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art, illustrated by Mary GrandPré, written by Barb Rosenstock (Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books)
  • Sam & Dave Dig a Hole, illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett (Candlewick Press)
  • Viva Frida, written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales (Roaring Brook Press, a Neal Porter Book)
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant (Eerdmans Books for Young Readers)
  • This One Summer, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki (First Second)
  • Blackout by John Rocco (Disney · Hyperion Books, an imprint of Disney Book Group)
  • Grandpa Green by Lane Smith (Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership)
  • Me...Jane by Patrick McDonnell (Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.)
  • A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever by Marla Frazee (Harcourt, Inc.)
  • How I Learned Geography by Uri Shulevitz (Farrar Straus Giroux)
  • A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williams , illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant (Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.)
  • Henry's Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad illustrated by Kadir Nelson, written by Ellen Levine (Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic)
  • First the Egg  by Laura Vaccaro Seeger (Roaring Brook/Neal Porter)
  • The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain  by Peter Sís (Farrar/Frances Foster)
  • Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity  by Mo Willems (Hyperion)



If you are interested in joining this challenge, then feel free to sign up down below: